Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Topics related to wrapped rotary machining in Aspire or VCarve Pro
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MAXJ
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Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by MAXJ »

I was asked if I could manufacture a part for a chef, as it is part of a Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler, that he can not buys as a replacement part.
Up to now I have not yet use my rotary 4th axis, I only read the articles that other people wrote with great interest.

The material looks like Nylon or HDPE
Diameter is 22.5mm
Horizontal Bayonet slot is 12.5mm
Vertical Bayonet slot is 9.5mm
Bayonet slot is 3.5mm

Has anybody made something like this before?
IMG_4709.JPG
IMG_4711.JPG

ozymax
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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by ozymax »

Looks like a perfect job for a 3D printer.

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TReischl
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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by TReischl »

If that is from a standard KitchenAid they sell the entire peeling attachments with blades for around the $100 mark.

I do not think it is a good job for a 3D printer. Stuff like that has a lot of torque on it and 3D printing tends to delaminate. Also there could be an issue with "food safe" depending on the material used to print.
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MAXJ
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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by MAXJ »

Thanks for the feedback guys, a 3D printer makes perfect sense for this part

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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by Rcnewcomb »

It could not be done using strictly the wrapped rotary output. The end-view shows areas that would not be cut with that strategy. To do the end either the piece would need to be turned 90 degrees, or that portion would need to be machined from the side/end rather than above. Material holding would be a challenge.
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MAXJ
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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by MAXJ »

Hi Randal,

my idea was to do the end part first, and then do the wrapping, but to get the index correct, would be tricky. So as the other team members suggested, 3D is the way to go these days.

Cheers

Max

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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by TReischl »

You can give it a try 3D printing obviously. But I have the feeling that the torque applied is going to tear it up very quickly. 3D prints have a grain structure just like wood. The problem will be printing that and getting the grain to run along the axis. Probably some support and then clean up after printing. I am not an expert by any means but I have learned pretty quickly about being careful how the grain flows in 3D printing.
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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by gkas »

There's carbon fiber, stiff TPU, and nylon and it's variations. They all make very stiff parts with some give. The part could be printed on its side longitudinally with supports from the bed.

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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by TReischl »

gkas wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 3:45 am
There's carbon fiber, stiff TPU, and nylon and it's variations. They all make very stiff parts with some give. The part could be printed on its side longitudinally with supports from the bed.
GK, I could use some edjumacashun here. . . . do those overcome or reduce the delamination/layer splitting effects? If so, I am going to have to learn how to print them. I just keep finding more and more uses for 3D printing and the only limitation I encounter is the layer splitting thing when it comes to mechanical strength.

If someone has the dimension for that piece I would be happy to model it.
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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by gkas »

TReischl wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 1:02 pm
gkas wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 3:45 am
There's carbon fiber, stiff TPU, and nylon and it's variations. They all make very stiff parts with some give. The part could be printed on its side longitudinally with supports from the bed.
GK, I could use some edjumacashun here. . . . do those overcome or reduce the delamination/layer splitting effects? If so, I am going to have to learn how to print them. I just keep finding more and more uses for 3D printing and the only limitation I encounter is the layer splitting thing when it comes to mechanical strength.

If someone has the dimension for that piece I would be happy to model it.
A great resource for this is CNC Kitchen on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiczXO ... hOL16EZiTg He not only does a LOT of testing of materials, but also tests directional stability, bonding, etc.

I've tried Priline TPU, one of the stiffer flexible filaments. It takes a bit to get it dialed in, but I was amazed at its flexibility ( :wink: :wink: ) of uses. One of my failed tests came out to be a swatch of (2) 0.20mm layers. I could not tear this swatch!! Yet, it was extremely flexible. I made some chisel caps, and they came out great. Fairly stiff, but not rubbery. I'm going to test some nylon and related filaments. I don't want to bother with a cabinet to print ABS, but who knows.

I am running a hardened steel nozzle, mainly to print glow-in-the-dark for the grandkids. I just ordered a solid Tungsten Carbide nozzle (not alloy) from 3DMaker Engineering. Most other places were either out of stock, or shipping to USA cost more than the nozzle. The TC nozzles are supposed to have the same heat characteristics as brass, so no temp changes.

This keeps me busy when the CNC isn't running.

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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by TReischl »

Thanks for that info GK!

Right now I am in the process of building a cabinet for printing ABS. I have had pretty good success just using a chopped up cardboard box. Left the front wide open so I could see what was going on. Even that worked fine. I have seen some of CNC Kitchen's videos. Agree, he is an in depth kinda guy. I think the box thing open in the front works for me because my shop is always pretty much around 70 - 75. The problem seemed to be drafts caused by a fan and AC unit.

I am sorta stuck right now on the "cabinet". Printed up corner connectors and got some 3/8 dowel and it all went together real well. My plan was to use some heavy duty translucent plastic sheet I have. Haven't found a glue yet that allows me to weld the corners together! CA glue just peels off the plastic. No idea what the plastic is, I am thinking vinyl because it is some kind of slippery.

This whole 3D printing adventure has been awesome! When all a person has is a wood shop pretty much everything seems to get made out of wood. That results in some clunky stuff, LOL. I do work in metal with a mini mill and lathe, but plastic fits the bill a lot of the time. Obviously way cheaper than aluminum.

I am thinking we need a 3D printing section on this forum. . . . I sort of feel guilty writing about it on here. But I guess since we can make models with the software it is ok. . . .

Thanks again for that info!
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Re: Kitchen Aid mechanical peeler

Post by gkas »

TReischl wrote:
Wed Jun 17, 2020 7:30 pm
I am thinking we need a 3D printing section on this forum. . . . I sort of feel guilty writing about it on here. But I guess since we can make models with the software it is ok. . . .
Actually, I use Aspire to create A LOT of 3D models. Since you can use CREATE SHAPE to model basic parts, then just push them together, then output the STL. Also, I can work in inches if need be, then convert to metric before I create my STL. This is much faster than Tinkercad. I don't get along with Fusion, but I'm working through FreeCAD. But, Aspire is still my go to.

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