Trex

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scotttarnor
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Trex

Post by scotttarnor »

I carved this for my granddaughter, 10x10” maple. Model height is about1/2”.
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TomWS
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Re: Trex

Post by TomWS »

LOL! I saw the title and thought you carved something out of TREX composite decking...

How did your granddaughter like it? It looks pretty ferocious!

My granddaughter and all of her friends LOVE dinosaurs. She's 3 and very good at it! :D

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scotttarnor
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Re: Trex

Post by scotttarnor »

TomWS wrote:
Thu Oct 14, 2021 1:11 am
LOL! I saw the title and thought you carved something out of TREX composite decking...

How did your granddaughter like it? It looks pretty ferocious!

My granddaughter and all of her friends LOVE dinosaurs. She's 3 and very good at it! :D
TomWS, She has not seen it yet, I will ship it and give it to her in December when I visit. She is 3 also and loves dinosaurs and dogs.
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garylmast
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Re: Trex

Post by garylmast »

I like it after you painted it. It really underscores it.

Gary

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scottp55
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Re: Trex

Post by scottp55 »

That's a Nice cut Scott!! :)
What was cutting strategy progression(and was new "auto" Rest Machining used?) ?
(Kinda ferocious for that age:) )
:) I thought decking when I saw the title too:)

That's Really tight curl on the Maple, but surprised that I like the overall effect with paint in the grain!!
SAVE that chunk of really close to "Fiddleback" Maple!
Might make a really good "Tiger" Zank VInlay someday! :)
Well Done Scott!
"When in doubt...Zero it out!"

No idea who, but first saying I learned the Hard Way
scott

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scotttarnor
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Re: Trex

Post by scotttarnor »

Thank You for the comments ! :D
Scott I did use the new "resting" feature. I have attached a photo to show what the second finish bit a 1/16 TBN cleaned up. Was it needed? no not really but it was doing something and this is a hobby so I did run it.
What it did show me is that after 2 years of use its time to retire my Frued 72-400 1/16 TBN, I retired the 72-300 1/32 TBN last week. That set served me well with 2 years of use but both started leaving more fuzzies on the last few carves.
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scottp55
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Re: Trex

Post by scottp55 »

Thanks Scott!

Were the last few projects also on similar highly figured wood?
Sometimes with the wood fibers going in all directions, it hits just wrong even with a sharp cutter.
(plunging(?) with the Rest Machining might exacerbate that?)
I haven't played with Rest Machining in VCP in actual cuts(I've been cutting the same thing for weeks).

You had a good run with those bits though! :)
When I first started and had 2 machines(1 220+ miles away) I started marking my bit holders with Sharpie marks( 1 full mark every 8 hrs cut time) so I could figure bit wear roughly for reorders.
Eventually with Bloodwood being best seller;
https://www.wood-database.com/bloodwood/
I had to use 1 full mark for every 4 hrs cut time.

Just went into shop yesterday, and .25mm TBNs in the Bloodwood Harleys were retired(maybe early)
at roughly 48 hrs cut time("Bloodwood is extremely dense, and has a pronounced blunting effect on cutters.")...but some of those bits used in Sugar Maple were 96+ hrs and still using them.

Also noticed on steep sidewalls, that all bits are not equal in cut quality when a lot of the edge was cutting.
How much material was left for the cutter is important too.
Finish with brand new .25mm TBNs on my last cuts that had them cutting .13" deep in 1 pass,
8.2.21 BLOODWOOD TINYS 4 .25MMTBN FINISH.jpg
9.9.21 MOM'S HARLEY DRY CUT Spetool .25MM TBN.jpg
was nowhere NEAR what I normally get when leaving .01-.02" of material!

My next job might be in a quilted Big Leaf Maple(soft), so I was interested.
Yattering:(

NICE job Scott! :)
"When in doubt...Zero it out!"

No idea who, but first saying I learned the Hard Way
scott

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Re: Trex

Post by fig.11 »

Im very new to CNC woodworking but Im an old hat 20+ years) to fine furniture woodwork. I say that only because I have plenty experience with some very exotic materials.
You will find that with a lot of tropical wood species that it is heavy in silica. That's the natural component in the wood that dulls cutting edges so quickly. Its extremely hard on my plane irons as those cutting edges are on the extreme side of sharp. The density of the wood is cause to slow down feed rate (IMO) for a better cut. Not to mention that those African wood types, like Bloodwood, Wenge, Purple/Yellow/Red Heart etc have a lot of interlocking grain (grain that tends to criss-cross and/or intersect itself) and it will leave you with a lot of tear out or splinter like fuzz. Many tropical woods also tend to be oily. If you find that your bits and blades are getting gummed up using these woods, it's because of the heat produced. When the wood gets heated up, it will sweat out some of that oily substance and gum up your cutting tools (not to mention sandpaper), which also adds to dulling your tools.

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