Drive Stand - 3D Print

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gkas
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Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by gkas »

There was another thread concerning 3D printing of shop stuff. I had mentioned that I design a lot of stuff in Aspire to print on my 3D printer. Tonight I needed a stand for one of my external hard drives. This took less than 5 minutes to design and output with Aspire.

1. Draw the end of the extrude section in 2D.
2. Use CREATE SHAPE FROM VECTOR OUTLINES on the section outline. I told Aspire to make the base height 100 mm. This is what I wanted for the length of my stand.
3. Export as STL to save as 3D model.
4. Slice the model in your favorite 3D slicer.
5. Print - 4 hours and $1.31 later, I have a custom drive stand.
Drive Base.jpg
Drive Holder.crv3d
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highpockets
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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by highpockets »

Nice job Gerry.
Really like having a 3D Printer in the Shop.

Thanks for sharing.
John
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TReischl
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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by TReischl »

Thanks for posting that Gerry!

Was just looking around my desk here in the shop and I could use a couple of those similar to what you designed. Soon as I finish what I am doing going to make a couple of those.
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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by SteveNelson46 »

Clever indeed! I'm looking for a 3D printer. Any recommendations?
Steve

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martin54
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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by martin54 »

I wonder how much that would have cost you to have made by a Company that specialise in that sort of thing, bit more than $1.31 I would guess :lol: :lol:
Once I get my head round how they work & the slicing software maybe I will be able to do the same :oops:

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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by gkas »

Depends on what you want to spend. I started out with a Creality CR10S for about $300-$400. I spent more time and money 'upgrading' and fixing than printing. Last prints were acceptable.

I decided to get a better quality printer. I wanted a 24V nozzle and bed for faster and more even heating. Direct drive extruder (like Bondtech, NOT Bowden) to print FLEX filaments, nylon, etc. The filament drive is right over the extruder. You can also get a hardened nozzle for about any printer. Built-in auto-leveling was a must. You MUST have a great first layer to produce great prints. My add-on leveling to the CR10S is nowhere as reliable as my Prusa.

I first shied away from Prusa because of the distance, duties, etc. They are made in Prague, Czech Republic. The more I read about them, the better I liked it. All parts are Open Source. You can print yourself another printer. Several people have tried this. They said it wasn't worth it trying to source all the parts for little difference in the cost. I ordered the Prusa i3 Mk3S. Shipping was quite reasonable at $50. Order time, at that time, was 2 weeks for the kit. No import duty on the kit. Prusa shipped from Prague to Southern California in 2 days when it was ready, via DHL. I highly recommend building the kit. Be careful and TAKE YOUR TIME. It pays off. If you build the kit, you are in a much better position to fix any later problems. ALL 3D printers will JAM, CLOG, and kill sensors. It's just a matter of how often. My printer has printed almost non-stop for over 4 months. The prints are extremely good. All of my repairs were my fault. Broken sensor wires and filament jambs.

The quality of parts and assembly instructions was VERY apparent. My CR10S had some very questionable parts that I later replaced. I bought some spares parts for my Prusa, and they can be ordered in the USA from Printed Solid and a couple of other places. For the quality, I am only buying only OEM replacement parts. They cost more, but are wayyyy better quality and performance.

In the case of 3D printers, you do get what you pay for. I traded up from 'my hobby is my 3D printer and it's upgrades' to 'I want to print quality parts with the least amount of hassle'. I easily spent the price difference on my CR10S to get it to print as good and reliable as my Prusa. The Prusa is straight out of the box. I would buy another Prusa MK3S in a heartbeat. Some lower cost, good printers are the Creality Ender 3 Pro, Creality Ender 5 Pro, Monoprice Select Mini V2. Another whole world are the resin printers.

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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by TReischl »

I have been running a Creality Ender 3 for about 4 months now. I am getting the results I wanted.

My machine does not have any bells or whistles. No auto bed leveling, bare bones machine. As has been mentioned above it pays to initially print a few things that help out for the machine itself. I added cable chains and a cooling duct for the electronics. Also repositioned the TF drive so it is actually ease to change discs.

The first layer is key as mentioned earlier. Also a little common sense is in order. Printing tall thin things without a "skirt" is a recipe for failure. It is important to understand that a 3d printer does NOT just lay melted plastic down. It is actually squished a bit so there are some side forces that can topple things that are not secured well to the print plate.

What type of filament being printed is also important. PLA prints pretty easily. ABS can be a challenge since it does a couple of things, the first being is that it shrinks as it cools. That is important for dimensionally accurate parts and it also causes layer delamination if you do not control the atmosphere temperature around the printer. For a while I just used a cardboard box with an open front and that kept any drafts from causing rapid cooling. Just finished building a nicer enclosure for ABS.

I have not tried a lot of other filament types. It pays to figure out what you are going to print and then match the machine to your needs (where have we heard that before?). Some machines, like mine are a bit limited in the higher temp ranges but I have no real need to print in the higher temp materials. Most of my stuff is for in the shop and ABS works well for outdoor things.

The actual process of getting a job going is downright simple. Create or obtain model, load in slicing software, select material and it will generate the file needed. After a person gets started then they can start playing with changing some settings like temp. A weird thing, most filaments have a temp "range" listed. This is one of those times where it is smart to start at the high temp and work your way down.

OK, this needs to be said. . . . a lot of stuff can be modeled in Aspire. But as we all know Aspire does not allow undercuts, so there is a limit to what is possible using Aspire. That is not a dig or complaint, Aspire was not designed to be a 3D solids modeler.
Capture.PNG
This is a model I am working on to suck up the smoke from a laser on the machine. It slips over the existing dust shoe (Kent CNC). I have a cobbled together mess that works like this but it is time to make something more permanent. This also works to keep the wood from flaming. All the pieces are being 3D printed except the dust shoe (yellow).
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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by martin54 »

Steve, I was looking about as well, I think to some degree it is a bit like buying a CNC or a Laser, first thing to ask yourself is what do you want it for & what sort of size do you need. I thought it might be something I could use for the business & was looking at what to me would be very expensive machines (£5000 +), I don't have that kind of money so would have meant trying to find it.
Then I realised that was a silly idea as I wasn't sure I would be able to use it properly or that anything I made would sell, decided I would be better buying a much cheaper machine to learn on & see how things went, if things work out I will look to invest in something else once I have my training wheels off :lol: :lol:

Got offered a second hand CR10 at what I thought was a reasonable price & I also know the guy that was selling it so figured I was buying his help & knowledge as well :lol: :lol:
I've not even looked at using it yet as I have other things need doing first.

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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by TReischl »

Hello Martin,

The folks who actually make money with these machines run "print farms". Lots of printers and usually not crazy expensive ones. It only makes sense. If you get an order for 20 somethings and you have one machine and the print time is 3 hours, well, there goes 60 hours. Or about three days. With 20 machines the order can be finished on the same day and shipped.

I have talked about this with cnc routers. Want to make money? Build cheap machines and have a bunch of them.
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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by garylmast »

About 5-years ago I wanted to get a top of line 3D printer so I got a Stratasys UPrint SE Plus that cost $23,000, that has two nozzles that prints PLA for the support and ABS for the material, and has all the bells and whistles including a washer to melt off the support material. At the time, there wasn't a lot of choices for cheaper commercial models, and I didn't really consider going with consumer unit. One thing I didn't realize was until after I bought it was the cost of materials. $200 for each roll, which requires one of each to run it. I noticed used ones now sell for under $2,000. Thinking about it now, I not sure if my brain was working or just a wild hair I had at the time, probably both.

At my winter home in Arizona, I purchased a Flashforge 3D printer with a few rolls of material from Amazon for under $400. It uses just PLA and each roll costs about $23.00. As far as the print I get from the cheaper one vs. the Wild Hair one is very, very close. The moral of the story is you don't need to go nuts to get get a 3D printer that gives you good results. One thing for sure, they do add a great addition to your shop.

Gary

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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by martin54 »

TReischl wrote:
Sat Jun 20, 2020 8:50 pm
Hello Martin,

The folks who actually make money with these machines run "print farms". Lots of printers and usually not crazy expensive ones. It only makes sense. If you get an order for 20 somethings and you have one machine and the print time is 3 hours, well, there goes 60 hours. Or about three days. With 20 machines the order can be finished on the same day and shipped.

I have talked about this with cnc routers. Want to make money? Build cheap machines and have a bunch of them.
Ted, yes I am aware of that but I wasn't looking to try & sell purely 3D printed items, I was looking to use it the same way you have done in one of the projects you posted, combining CNC & 3D print work in one project. That is one reason why I said I would see if I could sell anything first :lol: :lol:
There are people on other forums I use that run multiple CNC routers & multiple Lasers just churning stuff out but I am not sure I would be happy doing that. If I ever had enough money to start something like that I think my enjoyment of what I was doing would pretty quickly vanish :lol: :lol:
I don't do this for the money which is why I am poor :oops: :oops: Hoping to be able to turn it into a small part time Business & make a little money though :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by rtibbs »

Oh stop it you guy’s :mrgreen:
You’ve got me convinced that I really “Need” a 3D printer. Now the difficult part, which one.
I don’t want to go the route I did with my CNC machine. Bought a small unit to “see if it was something I’d be interesting in pursuing “ it was so I upgraded to a larger one then bought a third, the one I now have. Oh well, it’s only money :wink:

This time I’m going to do more research and not be so impulsive. (Ya right)

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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by highpockets »

I'm very happy with my CR10S the build plate is large enough to do most things 300mmx300mmx400mm. I have done a number of 3D printed parts to upgrade somethings, but that's just part of the fun of tinkering and making it yours. I think the best mods I've done are the Micro Swiss Hot End, TH3D EZABL bed leveler and a Raspberry PI with OctoPrint.
I believe the new kid on the block is the Ender 3 Pro which seems to be a good printer also, just don't know much about it...
John
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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by rtibbs »

highpockets wrote:
Sun Jun 21, 2020 6:13 pm
I'm very happy with my CR10S the build plate is large enough to do most things 300mmx300mmx400mm. I have done a number of 3D printed parts to upgrade somethings, but that's just part of the fun of tinkering and making it yours. I think the best mods I've done are the Micro Swiss Hot End, TH3D EZABL bed leveler and a Raspberry PI with OctoPrint.
I believe the new kid on the block is the Ender 3 Pro which seems to be a good printer also, just don't know much about it...
Thanks John.
OBTW, you’re going to have to add to your signature. “Maker of strings”

Ron

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Re: Drive Stand - 3D Print

Post by highpockets »

rtibbs wrote:
Sun Jun 21, 2020 6:44 pm
OBTW, you’re going to have to add to your signature. “Maker of strings”
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