Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

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Doe Master 444
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Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by Doe Master 444 »

I have searched the Vectric website, Vectric YouTube channel and the Vectric forum for tutorials on modeling isometric shapes and have come up pretty much empty handed. Does anyone know if any tutorials or other helpful information is out there somewhere? I feel I have a decent grasp on standard relief modeling, however, I struggle with creating isometric shapes. I am improving through experimenting on my own but it is challenging for me.

If nothing is currently available, I would like to put in a special request to the Vectric Team to produce a video tutorial or a mini series of tutorials that walks through the basics of creating the vectors and which modeling tools and techniques work best for isometric shapes.

I did come across a very nice project series that Beki did for a rabbit riding a bomb. The modeling video of this series did show the tail section being done as an isometric shape which did provide some insight for me, Thank you, Beki.

I also found on this forum a post made by Fleming titled "Lesson in two rail sweeps", it is a really old post and I could not get most of the links to open. The pdf files still work and were helpful, Thank you Fleming.

Regards, Steve

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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by mtylerfl »

Hi Steve,

What kind of isometric shapes are you wanting to do?
Basic shapes such as cubes, domes, pyramids, cylinders, and prism stars are easy to model, so I’m curious if you need something other than those.
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adze_cnc
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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by adze_cnc »

My question would be: what do you think you mean by "isometric drawing"?

Back in drafting classes "isometric drawings" were ones done with a 60 degree co-ordinate system (sort of a poor man's perspective). In that respect drawing in 60 degree increments in Aspire / VCarve is trivial.

Doe Master 444
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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by Doe Master 444 »

Michael,
I am interested in all that you have mentioned and more.

adze_cnc,
You are spot on. Yes, I understand isometric drawing in two dimension as it relates to drafting. So when I use the word "isometric" I am referring to the perspective.

Doe Master 444
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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by Doe Master 444 »

Just to clarify a bit I am not interested in any particular shape per say but more so the perspective of shapes and models. When I use the word "isometric" I am referring to an angled view perspective, not straight on. I can create shapes and models with a straight on perspective fairly decently, it is when I want a model to take on an angled perspective where I struggle.

Let me give some examples that might help. Let us look at the Vectric clipart "ships wheel" or "atv" clipart models, they both have a perspective which I consider a straight on view. I can design and model stuff like this all day long, but when I want to make a model appear angled (isometric) such as the "toy blocks" or "vintage car 2" clipart models this is where I struggle and could use some help.

Steve

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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by BillK »

Doe Master 444 wrote:
Wed Jun 16, 2021 5:01 pm
Just to clarify a bit I am not interested in any particular shape per say but more so the perspective of shapes and models. When I use the word "isometric" I am referring to an angled view perspective, not straight on. I can create shapes and models with a straight on perspective fairly decently, it is when I want a model to take on an angled perspective where I struggle.

Let me give some examples that might help. Let us look at the Vectric clipart "ships wheel" or "atv" clipart models, they both have a perspective which I consider a straight on view. I can design and model stuff like this all day long, but when I want to make a model appear angled (isometric) such as the "toy blocks" or "vintage car 2" clipart models this is where I struggle and could use some help.

Steve
You can take any component and use the tilt or fade function to add slight perspective. To add more you’ll need to learn how to use the distort tool, there you can angle components to make them appear to be viewed from a perspective. Watch some of Michael Mezalick’s video’s on youtube, he covers the use of the distort tool quite well.
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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by BillK »

blocks.JPG
as so
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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by mtylerfl »

Doe Master 444 wrote:
Wed Jun 16, 2021 5:01 pm
Michael,
I am interested in all that you have mentioned and more.

adze_cnc,
You are spot on. Yes, I understand isometric drawing in two dimension as it relates to drafting. So when I use the word "isometric" I am referring to the perspective.
There are many approaches to modeling and/or editing items to yield a "perspective view" effect.

Two-rail sweep, Distort, Tilt-Fade, and so on. There is another kind of fun and cool technique which can work well for some types of models you want to have a "perspective-style" ...

For example, create say, a 2" x 2" cube (use a square vector and the Plane shape to make the cube). Export the cube as an STL model.

Start a Job, then import the STL and use the Interactive model rotation (XYZ) tool to position the cube to the "perspective view" you prefer. You will likely want to reduce the Z by unlocking the XYZ ratio so only the Z entry will be applied. Then click OK when finished. You should now see a "perspective cube" on your job layout.

I made screenshot views of this example. Only took about 5-minutes-ish overall.
Attachments
Cube-stl-import-perspective-example.jpg
2-Cube-stl-import-perspective-example.jpg
z-view-Cube-stl-import-perspective-example.jpg
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Doe Master 444
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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by Doe Master 444 »

Michael,
That is an interesting concept. I can already envision the possibilities of using this technique in the future for certain projects.
Thanks for the feedback,
Steve

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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by TReischl »

Just to toss something in here. . . . an isometric view of an object is not strictly speaking a "perspective" view. There are no vanishing points and objects are scaled the same on all primary axis. Probably a better term for Isometric is "view" or "view point". Isometric view. Not Isometric perspective.

All that said, blah, blah, blah. . . . isometric is not a good choice for most things, they start looking wonky real quick because an isometric view has no vanishing point. A good rule when creating any sort of art work is:

If it looks correct, then it is correct. Trust your eye.
"If you see a good fight, get in it." Dr. Vernon Jones

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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by adze_cnc »

Bank President: I want a report of the top Rhyme Rates.

Flunky: Yes sir, you’ll have it tomorrow.

Flunky thinks: [Funny thing for him to ask for but that’s why he’s the boss…]

Next day

BP: Flunkiy! What do you mean Shakespeare! What does Shakespeare have to do with Prime Rates….



Sometimes it pays to get ones' definitions straight. I’m with Popper on Freud’s ideas.

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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by mezalick »

BP,
Something like this??

Michael
Penrose.jpg
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Re: Modeling isometric shapes using Aspire

Post by litzluth »

The Penrose triangle is cool. Escher-esque.
Here is what I think is a simple isometric cube. Using "draw polygon" create a six-sided shape. Rotate it 30 degrees. Draw an x to connect the 4 points on the sides. Draw a line to connect the midpoint to the bottom.
cube.crv3d
(22.5 KiB) Downloaded 20 times

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