Oak for V-carving

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Makingtoothpicks
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Oak for V-carving

Post by Makingtoothpicks »

Badge
Badge
I have a project that I will be v-carving small letters. The letters will be .5 to .75
Will oak work will the grain hold and not chip out. Something like this picture
This was a practice pieceThis is 6.5 inc and the letters are quite small.This
was cut on pine

Thank You
Don
Badge 2
Badge 2

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jfederer
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Re: Oak for V-carving

Post by jfederer »

I can't speak for Oak, but in Maple or Walnut you should have no problem at all.

Good to see you use quality Canadian-made tools!
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Re: Oak for V-carving

Post by lsvien »

Oak would not be my first choice. Maple would be my first go to and then cherry. As straight grain as you can find. I've done a few badges. The attached is maple using a 30 degree v bit. You might have to just settle for less detail. In this example there is a state outline in the middle that just wouldn't carve at the size I was using. Also because the box was cherry I pocketed out the badge outline and fit it in. That way if I messed up, (and I did more than once) I was only out the piece for the badge. It would end up chipping out and end up looking more like a raggedy hole than the state of Wisconsin. I've had similar experiences with other badges. That's why I keep telling my wife I need (not want) that laser attachment!
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Re: Oak for V-carving

Post by gkas »

lsvien wrote:
Fri Aug 21, 2020 3:47 am
Oak would not be my first choice. Maple would be my first go to and then cherry. As straight grain as you can find. I've done a few badges. The attached is maple using a 30 degree v bit. You might have to just settle for less detail. In this example there is a state outline in the middle that just wouldn't carve at the size I was using. Also because the box was cherry I pocketed out the badge outline and fit it in. That way if I messed up, (and I did more than once) I was only out the piece for the badge. It would end up chipping out and end up looking more like a raggedy hole than the state of Wisconsin. I've had similar experiences with other badges. That's why I keep telling my wife I need (not want) that laser attachment!
The pocket looks like you've added a slight chamfer? It's a nice look for the inlay.

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Re: Oak for V-carving

Post by GEdward »

There is a big difference between white oak and red oak. I agree with the other opinions regarding detail on red oak as the grain structure is hollow. White oak on the other hand has the grain structure filled and thus can support finer detail carving. The best way to determine which species you are dealing with is to cut a thin slice off the end grain. If you hold it up to a light source you will see that red oak looks like a sieve while white oak will appear solid. I might try quarter sawn white oak to give your v-carve some extra character.

Ed

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Re: Oak for V-carving

Post by dealguy11 »

I'd probably choose rift sawn over quartersawn personally. Quartersawn has beautiful ray flakes that can clash with a carving.

In any case, an open-grained wood like oak would not be my first choice for a detailed carving. Agree that white oak is a better choice, but even there the grain can distract from the carving. A close grained wood like maple, cherry, birch, or perhaps basswood would be where I would look first.
Steve Godding
D&S Artistic Woodworking http://www.dsartisticwood.com

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Re: Oak for V-carving

Post by Makingtoothpicks »

Thank you for the replies.The reason I asked about oak is that I had some
and thought I would use it. I will get some maple.

Thank You
Don

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Re: Oak for V-carving

Post by lsvien »

Hadn't really considered basswood. While relatively soft if you cut it with a brand new very sharp bit it might hold pretty good. I would worry about the interior parts of letters like A's, G's and R's. That's where your probably going to see some problems if your too small.

gkas - yes there is a slight chamfer to the badge. Common technique in Woodsmith magazine. Since a person probably will not get the inlay to be a perfect fit you might as well make it a design feature and make it stand out with a chamfer. Very slight, I don't remember but probably only 0.01" or so.

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Re: Oak for V-carving

Post by martin54 »

I've never tried carving American Oak of any kind. There must be a difference between that & european Oak because I machine it quite regulally. I wouldn't have a problem doing lettering at the size Don has mentioned, I don't really consider that to be small :lol: :lol: :lol:
Maple is quite hard for me to get hold of, I would have to order online but if I am looking for a white coloured wood I can use Hornbeam, Lime which seem to carve quite well.

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Re: Oak for V-carving

Post by scottp55 »

Don,
Just my 2 cents also:)
I like both Cherry and Sugar Maple for small fonts(or any close grained, fine pored wood).
2.9.20  HARLEY BACK DONE  2jpg.jpg
cherry.jpg
Choice of font when you get smaller than that can make a huge difference,
and also as I go smaller I generally go a steeper bit, until when I go .2" or smaller...
almost always a 30 degree.
Vladimir Script ONsrud 30degree .005 tip.jpg
But depending on size and appearance I choose the angle.
Like on these blocks it was all a 45degree $4 Drillman1 Kyocera .125" shank (.0125" flat) with Franklin Gothic Demi(with Bold option checked)
10.14.18 BLOCK PICK UP 11.jpg
Also as I go smaller, I reduce Feed rates a lot, but Plunge speed can be a big culprit of tearout.
For sub .2" fonts I'm REALLY liking Michael Tyler's setting I read here of .3IPS Feed and .3IPS Plunge!

Got a job for a bunch of Ladies for custom buttons in Cherry,
and REALLY didn't want to Muck up a single letter for their collections(they paid $20 Each per button)!
I had been gifted my first Onsrud conical 1 flute engraving bit(30 degree .01" flat),
and hadn't had virtually any tearout getting used to it....ordered a 30 degree with a .005" flat...
Every single one was good (also Franklin Gothic Demi).
BELFAST 2.jpg
Because it's not an upspiral, it seems to not lift the edges on delicate deep cuts...My Go-To now :)

Also like a Michael, on a lot of stuff (like lettering small fonts)...
I repeat the exact same toolpath to get a better finish(and less sanding:).

There! A rambling 2 cents worth :)

Good luck Don! :)
"When in doubt....Zero it out!"
anon saying


scott

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