Inlay on a curved surface

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Aussie
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Inlay on a curved surface

Post by Aussie »

I understand that you can v carve on a 3D object but to cut the male inlay is not possible... correct me if I am wrong ?
The alternative would be to resin fill the v carve, what would be the best way to stop the resin from flowing to the lowest point ? The v carve is just text... I gather you make a dam high enough to ensure the highest point of the curved material receives enough resin, then re-run the finishing tool path to remove the excess resin.

Any advice would be appreciated.

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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by mtylerfl »

Hi Ron,

I did epoxy inlays on one of my free Vectric projects - it is a vase with a gently curved surface. I just overfilled the recesses after sealing the wood, then sanded off the excess epoxy. Here’s the link to that project:

https://www.vectric.com/vectric-communi ... tInlayVase

Someone recently mentioned using hot glue as a barrier dam around the fills. I think that’s a good idea and I’ll try in the future.

Also, I watched a video about epoxy inlays where the fellow heated up the metal end of a putty knife and “sliced off” the bulk of excess cured overfill before final sanding. I think that’s a real time-saver and will try that on future projects, too.
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Aussie
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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by Aussie »

mtylerfl wrote:
Sat Jun 20, 2020 3:17 am
Hi Ron,

I did epoxy inlays on one of my free Vectric projects - it is a vase with a gently curved surface. I just overfilled the recesses after sealing the wood, then sanded off the excess epoxy. Here’s the link to that project:

https://www.vectric.com/vectric-communi ... tInlayVase

Someone recently mentioned using hot glue as a barrier dam around the fills. I think that’s a good idea and I’ll try in the future.

Also, I watched a video about epoxy inlays where the fellow heated up the metal end of a putty knife and “sliced off” the bulk of excess cured overfill before final sanding. I think that’s a real time-saver and will try that on future projects, too.
Thank you Michael for the advice
The shape is a 3D dome and I would like to place text around the dome... will do a test run with the resin and see how it goes.

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highpockets
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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by highpockets »

This may be too simple an example, but something like this?
Image 882.png
Re-reading your reply would something like this more like it?
Image 883.png
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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by JoeBlow »

Aussie wrote:
Sat Jun 20, 2020 2:05 am
I understand that you can v carve on a 3D object but to cut the male inlay is not possible... correct me if I am wrong ?
Not impossible...need to create a negative impression of your model and project the male v-carve to that model. Here's an example of a male inlay carved on a concave shape that will fit the female convex shape. Haven't pushed it to the limits yet to see just how far one could go with this, but it worked great for this piece. I don't see why it would not work on the dome you're creating.
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Sakura_Male.JPG
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Sakura Barrette.JPG

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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by martin54 »

You could look at using fused silica in your epoxy resin, adding fused silica will produce a thicker epoxy resin that is less likely to flow to the lowest point, you would need to experiment a bit to ensure you had the right mix & it would also depend on the domed shape.
I've experimented a bit with it & results were good. Speak to a company that specialise in Epoxy resins for some advice :lol: :lol: :lol:

Not the best picture to show what I mean but the Vase fronts (red & Green) were done this way, will see if I can find some better pictures
exhibition1.jpg

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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by jimwill2 »

I haven't tried this on a model, but what if you cut the v-carve tool path and apply some resin before you cut the model? Maybe cut do a rough cut on the model and then the resin. Just a thought.
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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by Aussie »

Thank you all for the advice

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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by mfirlott »

What I've been doing lately in such cases is to cut the inlay and pour the epoxy while my piece is still square and flat. I just ensure that I cut the inlay deep enough so that when I then followup with the 3D toolpath, the lowest parts still have epoxy left in them.

That's how I cut my epoxy name into this badge...cut inlay and pour epoxy when wood is still flat then 3D cut.

As a side note...I mentioned previously that I use my hot glue gun to place a dam around my inlay to stop the resin from over flowing. Works great for me.
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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by Aussie »

mfirlott wrote:
Mon Jun 22, 2020 3:08 pm
What I've been doing lately in such cases is to cut the inlay and pour the epoxy while my piece is still square and flat. I just ensure that I cut the inlay deep enough so that when I then followup with the 3D toolpath, the lowest parts still have epoxy left in them.

That's how I cut my epoxy name into this badge...cut inlay and pour epoxy when wood is still flat then 3D cut.

As a side note...I mentioned previously that I use my hot glue gun to place a dam around my inlay to stop the resin from over flowing. Works great for me.
Thanks Mitch.
Is the hot glue affected by using the torch to pop the air bubbles?
Ron

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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by mfirlott »

Hi Ron. I put the hot glue about an inch or so away from my epoxy and I do use a torch and/or heat gun to release bubbles and have not had any (or many) issues. If I stay too long with the heat then yes...not only does the glue smoke and stink, but I create a crust on the epoxy and ruin it. So moving the flame or heat around is critical to not overheating the glue or ruining the epoxy.

But other than the occasional ruined epoxy by overheating it, I have had no issues with the hot glue dam and heat.
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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by Aussie »

mfirlott wrote:
Tue Jun 23, 2020 2:48 pm
Hi Ron. I put the hot glue about an inch or so away from my epoxy and I do use a torch and/or heat gun to release bubbles and have not had any (or many) issues. If I stay too long with the heat then yes...not only does the glue smoke and stink, but I create a crust on the epoxy and ruin it. So moving the flame or heat around is critical to not overheating the glue or ruining the epoxy.

But other than the occasional ruined epoxy by overheating it, I have had no issues with the hot glue dam and heat.
Thank you Mitch

If you ruin the epoxy do you run the v carve tool path again or do you use another method to remove the damaged epoxy?
Ron

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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by mfirlott »

As overheating causes the epoxy to have a skin, I scoop out what I can, let it harden, then yes...rerun the toolpath to clear out any remnants and start over. I've gotten better at it and now it's a rare occurrence but it does happen when I rush the process. Oddly enough...patience and care works best. Do not overheat or stay on one spot too long with your heat source. Low heat and steady movements works best. Always moving, never staying in one spot with the heat. I also use a toothpick to lift those bubbles out that do not cooperate with the heat.
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Re: Inlay on a curved surface

Post by Roly »

What I have done with text on a curved surface is to use plastibond coloured with acrylic artist paint. Simply fill scrape level and sand smooth after setting. It is advisable to seal timber first with some estapol or shellac

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