Most detailed yet with this process

Gallery for images of work cut using PhotoVCarve
GEdward
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Most detailed yet with this process

Post by GEdward »

I thought I would see how much detail I could achieve with this process on wood. I downloaded a picture from pixabay that fit the bill and went to work. I put both images on one piece of wood; one on one side and the other on the flip side to use as examples. Here is what I ended up with. While there is room for improvement for sure, I am happy with the results so far. These are only the third and fourth images I have produced using this technique and I am learning with each endeavor.
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the-old-man-1749355_1920.jpg1.jpg
the-old-man-1749355_1920.jpg2.jpg

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hooked
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by hooked »

The pics look great. You mentioned a process and technique but gave no details. I'm certainly interested in how you achieved such terrific results. THANKS.

GEdward
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by GEdward »

I describe the process in my post "New process first attempt" about a month ago.

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hooked
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by hooked »

Apologies, I will check it out. THANKS.

GEdward
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by GEdward »

I snapped a photo of two of my grand kids last week and processed it as a gift for their mom. I think she will be happy with it.
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Dani & Tanis Aug 2017.jpg

cstidham
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by cstidham »

Looks nice! I'm going to have to try this!

ezurick

Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by ezurick »

Looks really nice. I read back on your other post describing you settings and method. I assume once again you used epoxy to get the results?

I sure wish Vectric would update vcarve v10 to include ball nose tools for the photocarve toolpath. We are limited to only v bits... kinda dumb. I really want to try a ball nose.

Jhodge76
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by Jhodge76 »

Those are awesome, I really like them.

GEdward
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by GEdward »

ezurick wrote:I assume once again you used epoxy to get the results?
Yes I did use the epoxy process for them.
ezurick wrote:We are limited to only v bits...
I think it is probably possible to accomplish the carving using the VCarve 10 version of Photo VCarve even with the tooling limitation. I don't have version 10 (yet) but I am tempted to use my Photo VCarve to duplicate what would happen if I set up the parameters using a v bit and then substitute a .25 radius tapered ball end mill instead. Now that you are able to set line spacing in version 10 to anything you want it should be doable. The preview might look a little rough but the result should turn out good???

My reasoning is that as long as the side angle is correct and the step over within .003 to .005 inches that the calculations tor the v bit tool path would be nearly identical to tool path generated for a small radius tool.

Then if that does work then it should be possible to make lithophanes as well. Since you can invert an image (create a negative in effect) using the photo editing ability in VCarve this should cause the bit to cut dark areas shallow and light areas deeper to achieve the gray scale effect needed for lithophanes. I'm just guessing here so if you beat me to the punch with this experiment please let me, and everyone else, know how it turns out.

Jan.vanderlinden
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by Jan.vanderlinden »

The work your doing is beautiful.
I guess i will have to start stalking your posts.
I am still struggling miserably and making lots of firewood.
What type of wood do you use?
“I've learned so much from my mistakes, I'm thinking of making a few more”

GEdward
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by GEdward »

Because it is the whitest wood I can find I typically use aspen. It provides very good contrast. It is also inexpensive which is a plus if things don't go well. :? But it does have drawbacks. For one it is quite soft which, in addition to limiting detail somewhat, it often leaves behind a lot of fuzzies that have to be dealt with before pouring the epoxy. The other big drawback is that it is quite porous so stains and paint bleed quite easily. I found that staining and sealing the wood before I start is the best defense against unwanted stain encroaching into the photo.

Maple works well too and because it is harder you can get finer detail out of it. It leaves behind a nice clean surface, free of fuzz and is not so prone to bleeding. The main caveat is that sometimes you get some "curly" maple effect which can detract from the appearance of the photo. With that said, I have had the curly maple effect kind of enhance the photo a bit too.

I have not tried birch but I suspect it works on par with maple with regard to machining characteristics. I don't have a good source for it is the main reason I have not tried it. Although I could try Baltic birch plywood I suppose. If it does work it would be very economical for sure.

One bit of advise to get the best results from any project on your CNC is to dial in your finish tools with a dial indicator. I almost never allow more than .001'' total indicated run out with any finish tool. If the tool is swirling around like a swizzle stick on the surface of your work it can't use its cutting geometry to very good effect.

ezurick

Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by ezurick »

GEdward wrote: One bit of advise to get the best results from any project on your CNC is to dial in your finish tools with a dial indicator. I almost never allow more than .001'' total indicated run out with any finish tool. If the tool is swirling around like a swizzle stick on the surface of your work it can't use its cutting geometry to very good effect.
Sorry to post such a newbie question... but could you elaborate a bit more on this 'dial in' procedure please? What tool are you using to do this dial in and what is your method?

I assume that you have shaved off the material a bit to ensure the surface is completely level before carving. This is why it is important that you want to dial in the tool, correct? And I am assuming you mean the 'Z' zero to the material surface. Right?

GEdward
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by GEdward »

ezurick wrote:could you elaborate a bit more on this 'dial in' procedure please? What tool are you using to do this dial in and what is your method?
Run-out is the amount by which the tool is not true to the center line of the spindle. To check how much that run-out is you need a test indicator and a means to position the indicator to contact the cutter. Something like this should work for most wood working applications.

I thought I could find something on Youtube but most of the videos are geared to the high precision needed for metal working. With that said you can get a pretty good idea of how it is done. In short, position the indicator contact on the cutter, near the end is best but not mandatory, then rotate the spindle by hand to see how much the needle moves.

The main point is that the truer the tool runs, the longer the tool life and the better the finish on you work. First of all make sure that there is no dust, rust, dings or dents on any of your components before you start. To correct run-out less than .002" I usually can accomplish that with a small brass punch and 4 oz. brass hammer and tap lightly on the high side as indicated. I say lightly because small diameter carbide tools are quite brittle and won't take any abuse. If it does not readily move into place or if the initial run-out is more than .002" I loosen the nut and rotate the cutter 180 degrees, tighten the nut and test it again. If after three or four attempts I can't get under .001" then I either get a different cutter, collet or both and try again.

I hope this helps.

ezurick

Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by ezurick »

I think I understand the principle, but it would help me understand if I could see a picture of a few things.. like, how are you attaching the tool to the spindle? But if I use common sense, I am not sure how on earth the spindle could be off center. If you say it is possible, then it must be... it is something that is never talked about...

GEdward
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Re: Most detailed yet with this process

Post by GEdward »

It is not necessary to attach the indicator to the spindle. That is one option and it works well if you have a bracket assembly designed for that purpose. Another option, and probably the easiest, is to use a indicator base to hold and position the indicator. Something like this: Never mind the magnetic part as long as the base is heavy and stable enough to just sit on the spoil board or table and hold the indicator in position.

While it is possible for the spindle to be off it most likely is not. So you are right in that respect. What is off center is the tool/bit. When you attach the tool to the spindle there are a number of components that can cause the tool/bit to not run true to the spindle. For example if while you are mounting the bit into your spindle and a wood chip was lodged between the collet and spindle when you tighten the nut then that would force the bit to not run concentric with the spindle. It would be cocked and wobble around a lot. Perhaps so badly that you could see it by eye. Or maybe you dropped the collet on your concrete floor and put a ding on it. Most of the time the cutter is not off so obviously but it is off. To know exactly how much it is off you need an indicator. You place the indicator to touch to cutting tool and rotate the spindle by hand to see how much the tool is wobbling.

If I had some basic video equipment and an assistant I would make a no nonsense video and post on Youtube. In searching "end mill run out" I can find a few instructional videos but as I say, most of them are far more technical and involved than they need to be for the purposes of wood working at the hobby level. But they do show how the indicator can be mounted and how to use the indicator.

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