Which CNC Bit for engraving Wood

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Which CNC Bit for engraving Wood

Postby chris@manabeads.com » Mon May 02, 2016 4:32 pm

Hey guys. I am sure this has been asked before, but I am getting too much information by using the search function.

What I want to is to engraving a map of the world on wood. It took me awhile to find a vector based map of the world, but found one. Problem is my 1/16" TBN is way to wide.

Going through the tutorials, I see an example for a spring-loaded diamond bit, but 1) i am having trouble locating one and 2) i am not sure this is the right bit for engraving wood.

Perhaps an engraving knife is the right answer? But before I buy, I want to confirm that others have good success with them...

Thanks everyone !

Chris
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Re: Which CNC Bit for engraving Wood

Postby adze_cnc » Mon May 02, 2016 7:03 pm

Engraving as shown in the images?

This was done in MDF using a 30-degree engraving bit with a 0.01" flat tip. It happened to be one from Onsrud but there are plenty to choose from. A deeper line, 1/32", was wanted otherwise I might have used a 60- or 90-degree v-bit.

Steven
Attachments
dymaxion.jpg
Dymaxion map table top in MDF (detail)
dymaxion-full.jpg
Dymaxion map table top in MDF (72x34 inches)
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Re: Which CNC Bit for engraving Wood

Postby chris@manabeads.com » Mon May 02, 2016 8:06 pm

adze_cnc wrote:Engraving as shown in the images?

This was done in MDF using a 30-degree engraving bit with a 0.01" flat tip. It happened to be one from Onsrud but there are plenty to choose from. A deeper line, 1/32", was wanted otherwise I might have used a 60- or 90-degree v-bit.

Steven


Cool looking project :D I have a 60 and 90 degree V Bit, and a 1/16" Tapered Ball Nose. I was hoping for a sharper line. The pic below is from VCarve with a 1/16"TBN at 1/64" in 3D and 2D. You can't really tell in the 3D version...
Attachments
Capture.PNG
Capture.PNG
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Re: Which CNC Bit for engraving Wood

Postby JoeM » Mon May 02, 2016 8:54 pm

You might want to make a test board before you get too much further along. Take all the bits you have and make short lines with them at varying depths on a piece of scrap.You'll get an idea of what .02 looks like vs .04, 30 degrees V vs 45 or 60 or a ball etc. If you write the bit/depth off to the side you can use it for planning future projects until you get a better feel for what each one does at different depths.

I think a 30 degree V with a sharp point (no flat) will make a much sharper looking line than any ball nose will ever get you.
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Re: Which CNC Bit for engraving Wood

Postby Samson » Mon May 02, 2016 9:18 pm

I use a 30deg. v-bit @ .015 and it creates a nice fine line. Going a little deeper or changing to a 60deg. v-bit will give a wider line.
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Re: Which CNC Bit for engraving Wood

Postby martin54 » Tue May 03, 2016 12:57 am

The diamond bits you have seen mentioned on the forum are generally used for drag engraving on plastics & metals, the diamond bit does not revolve (spindle is switched off) & the bit scratches the material as it is dragged across, the fact that it is sprung loaded keeps pressure on the diamond as it is dragged & also ensures contact is maintained if the surface is not completely flat. Not really the best option for wood although I guess it would work to some degree.
How good a finish & how fine you can machine your lines will depend on your machine being set up correctly, the table & material being flat & the type of wood as well as what bit you use.
A lot of engraving bits have a flat at the bottom rather than come to a point, so as well as using a bit with a shallow angle you need one with the smallest flat possible or a bit that comes to a point.
A ball nose bit no matter how small is always going to give you a wider line than a bit that comes to a point.

Joe has a very good suggestion with the test board he has mentioned.
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