Another Sign R2KBA

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Another Sign R2KBA

Postby TReischl » Fri Mar 29, 2019 1:10 am

This one is about 1.5 deep. It is about 18 inches wide. The material is big box construction lumber, 2X6 to be exact. Cut them to length, then ripped them in half. Fed them thru the belt sander to get two sides flat for gluing. Glued.

Rouged at 300 IPM with a 10mm endmill across the grain. Mixed results with that. Made sure I pocketed a relief around the outside to make room for the collet. Finished with a 2mm tapered ball nose bit. The finish is one coat sanding sealer.

This one is going to my step son.

R2KBA.jpg
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby highpockets » Fri Mar 29, 2019 1:44 am

Great work Ted....
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby Bob Reda » Fri Mar 29, 2019 4:22 am

very nice

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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby WNC_Ed » Fri Mar 29, 2019 11:21 am

That is fabulous!
Great job & congrats.
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby Leo » Fri Mar 29, 2019 2:02 pm

Awesome TED,

Construction is not really all that dry (seasoned).

I will be very interested in how that stands up after is "really" dries out.

I generally have not had good luck with that.
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby garylmast » Fri Mar 29, 2019 2:23 pm

Another great job. I had to look at it twice, it looked like you machine it out of MDF. Fine detail.
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby newmexico » Fri Mar 29, 2019 2:43 pm

Not to impune your great work... Just offering our experience here.

When you remove too much material from one side, it can bow the piece.
We've had to add bracing on the back side of projects like that to flatten the piece.

Nice work!
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby dwilli9013 » Fri Mar 29, 2019 3:31 pm

Nice. Sure to be well received. Thanks for sharing. :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby TReischl » Fri Mar 29, 2019 8:14 pm

Leo wrote:Awesome TED,

Construction is not really all that dry (seasoned).

I will be very interested in how that stands up after is "really" dries out.

I generally have not had good luck with that.


Leo, there is a trick to it. "white" pine lumber dries very, very fast, especially if one stands it out in the NC sun several days in a row. That is how I start it out. Because construction lumber is so cheap I buy quite a bit at a time. After it has been out in the sun for a few days I move it into the air conditioned shop. The other thing I have been doing is cutting pieces to a rough length. Since it is so cheap I am not worried if I create some scrap. At $1.00 per bf a person can try things.

Another "trick" I use is to cut between most knots, so when I am picking it out at the store I pay attention to the spacing between knots. I generally look for about 2 feet between knots, more or less.

And THEN. . . they do not sell "white" pine wider than 2 X 6 in this neck of the woods. Wider boards are all SYP. Not so good unless one is willing to wait much longer for them to dry. So when I am visiting the brother and sister in law north of here I buy some decent 2X12's which have way fewer knots and haul them back.

BTW, one normally gets in trouble with pine when building something like furniture with it when it is too wet. Of course the same is true for any lumber. But a glued up flat panel that has no constraints on it has no reason to come apart, what it can and will do is warp.

I have a yard sign I made five years ago that hangs on our fence that is about 2 foot square using the same technique. Other than needing a repainting it is just fine. Just think, this sign gets baked, and I mean BAKED, in the NC sun and then gets drenched in our rain storms.

Here is a thought, give it a try, it will cost you all of about five and a half bucks in lumber! (Use water proof glue if it goes outside)
Last edited by TReischl on Fri Mar 29, 2019 8:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby TReischl » Fri Mar 29, 2019 8:25 pm

newmexico wrote:Not to impune your great work... Just offering our experience here.

When you remove too much material from one side, it can bow the piece.
We've had to add bracing on the back side of projects like that to flatten the piece.

Nice work!


Well, that is one way of doing it I suppose.

I use a different method because adding bracing then places constraints on the boards (that cross grain thing). Yup, I know about slotting the screw holes to allow movement, but that does not always work when the wood absorbs some moisture in the rainy season and the wood is really bound up. Besides, there is not always enough thickness at the edge to allow screws.

On work like this I do not clamp on the top surface or screw the workpiece to the spoilboard. Instead I cut a slot on the edges about a half inch from the bottom of the pieces on two sides. Then I can clamp using those slots. You will see why shortly. I also leave about 1/4 inch of material holding the part in the block. Like this:

20190329_153503.jpg


When I machine a sign like that I leave the four corners on the work. Think of them like feet upside down.

After machining the finish side of the sign I remove the clamps. Generally I will let the piece sit around a day or so to allow it to warp if it wants to, which it usually does.

Then I put it in the machine and use the same slots to clamp it in upside down. Since it is clamping on the corners it does not pull the work flat again. And since the clamps are below the top surface I can just run a pocketing pass to flatten the back.

Presto!

Of course if it warped a lot the edge thickness is going to vary a bit. But for what I am doing it is no big deal.

BTW, when you add "bracing" to remove the warp how many of your pieces have split because of the stress you put the wood under?
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby Leo » Sat Mar 30, 2019 1:29 pm

I have 2 sawmills within 5 miles from me. Both of them cut native eastern white pine. One place air dries only and one place does kiln drying. They are less expensive that the big box stores. The place with a kiln is where I buy firewood from and one of the owners sons has cut trees for me and has done some saw milling of oak trees for me. Small family sawmill, really nice people.

The place that does air dried is incredibly inexpensive and is 2.5 miles away from me.

Both places have been here forever. Both are WELL known.

I have a friend that has a very very large shop (50 x 150 2 floors) and stores STACKS of Eastern White pine indoors.

I think I will go buy a pile and just let sit stickered for a year or two under cover. Pretty sure I can get 2 x 12's. I have been wanting to do this anyway. This fits like a glove to my retirement plans.

I will most certainly give it a try.
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Re: Another Sign R2KBA

Postby TReischl » Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:47 pm

Leo:

Sounds like a plan!

IMHO pine is a very underrated lumber by lots of woodworkers these days. When I am building a project the first thing I do is think about how it will be used. For instance, when I have built tables and chairs I know they are going to get a lot of use so I immediately think hardwood because they are resistant to dents and dings. The next thing is finish. If they are going to be painted and not get a lot of abuse like say an end table I may build the base out of pine and the top from a hardwood.

When it comes to shop stuff I rarely use hardwood. Shop furniture is all pine. A jig that gets a lot of use will be from hardwood.

One of the issues a lot of woodworkers have with pine is the knots. They do not look good, affect the strength of the wood, finish lousy, and can bleed through finishes. Obviously breaking down the wood is part of the solution and also initial selection.

Years and years ago in one of the well known woodworking magazines they had a country style hutch project out of pine. The writer talked about how pine may be soft but that it requires really sharp tools to work properly and it pays to have your work area free of tools and other things that can cause dents. One of the things I have found with pine is that it really pays to apply two coats of sanding sealer. The first coat helps with the sanding, the second helps prevent dents and dings.

You probably remember this. Years ago when I lived in your neck of the woods (not when you and I met up five years ago, but about 40 years before that) the stores were full of pine furniture, colonial style stuff. Things like dining room sets stood up to use alright but they were prone to dents, scratches, etc. I have an old pine rocker that I bought up there. It has a very thick slab of pine for the seat, arms are pine, back slats and even the rockers. I refinished it about 5 years ago. Still works great and looks good!
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