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End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:24 pm
by jssussex@gmail.com
I'm trying to help a friend out on an end grain cutting board that he wants to inlay this image.
raiders inly pattern.jpg

The problem is that the facial detail is so fine I don't believe I can successfully carve this. The facial outline is only .046 wide.
I was gong to do an MDF test but then since the cutting board is 1 1/2 inches and he would like to do a 1/2 thick walnut end grain inlay I decide I'd ask the experts here their opinion before I damage a beautiful end grain blank. Also what glues do you use for endgrain. all my experience is in shallow flat grain decorative inlays.

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 3:41 pm
by potzmannwoodshop
Reduce the detail but keep the theme/idea, I agree that you will have problems with this inlay is set up currently

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 5:00 pm
by scubanimal
Given its a cutting board, and the details of the face being thin, but just the face outline, I might consider using an endmill and going a bit deeper and using an dyed epoxy or something for the fine facial features, then the walnut for the rest.
just a thought,
Ian

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2018 3:45 am
by Trock
I've read several tips and all say that no epoxy is truly safe on a cutting board.
Works for an area you know the knifes will not cut into it though.

Agree with Potzmannwoodshop, a reduction in the detail, replace some of the thin lines with stylized wider paths, be creative. Cold be cool.

Best Luck

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2018 5:04 am
by highpockets

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2018 8:38 pm
by Samson
Trock wrote:I've read several tips and all say that no epoxy is truly safe on a cutting board.
Works for an area you know the knifes will not cut into it though.

Agree with Potzmannwoodshop, a reduction in the detail, replace some of the thin lines with stylized wider paths, be creative. Cold be cool.

Best Luck



There are several direct food contact, FDA approved epoxies on the market. There is at least one that is completely organic. Absolutely no VOC's, no chemicals, etc.

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2018 12:29 am
by mtylerfl
I wouldn't be cutting on the "pretty side" anyway!

I would cut food on the plain backside only so I don't destroy the design.

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 5:04 pm
by jssussex@gmail.com
highpockets wrote:https://theepoxyexperts.com/shop/adhesives/max-clr-24-oz-epoxy-resin-food-safe-fda-compliant-clear-high-impact-coating/

Thanks this helps

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 11:14 pm
by Mike-S
Wood filler (Minwax) can be used on end grain as well as regular grain.

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2018 10:31 pm
by MTSO
I think you might be surprised at the sort of detail you can get with a v-carve inlay. Have a look at mtmwood and his inlayed cutting boards, the main problem with end grain v carving is having the male inlay chipping with the finer detail. I find that by reducing the cutting angle to say 30 degrees on fine detail your inlay has more depth and better glue area (also easier to chip I suppose).
Practice pieces are always the best way of testing your designs.

regards

Brian

Re: End Grain inlay question - challenge

PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2018 10:17 am
by weirdbeard
Im with Brian

I did this with 30 degree vbit

viewtopic.php?f=29&t=27374&hilit=aussie

(If you have a look you can see the cross at the top of the crown )