Wooden gear clocks

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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby Gingernut » Tue Jun 01, 2010 12:20 pm

A very interesting article Greg, but I must beg to differ on a few points. The energy used by the friction between pallet side and escapement wheel comes from the pendulum and not from the clock, this friction however is fast negligible as both surfaces over time become so highly polished. As to backlash, the distance the escapement wheel travels until it hits the pallet side is energy that basically does nothing at all, but it does deliver the satisfying “tick” as it hits the pallet side, and let´s be quite honest that is one of the nice things about a wooden clock. The most accurate pendulum is one that hardly swings at all, that is true, it does however require very small tolerances that are very hard to realise in wood. If the swing is too small it could happen that when the drive force reduces (which with a wooden clock can quickly happen) the escapement wheel could hit the pallet face rather than the pallet side, which would negate the whole point of a deadbeat escapement. Also because of the fact that the clock is made from wood the cogs need to be bigger which obviously increases inertia and therefore the weights need to be bigger.In one respect I wholeheartedly agree with you that the biggest problem faced by any clock maker is friction.
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby signmaker » Thu Jun 24, 2010 9:49 pm

Thanks Dave

I have been overseas on holiday for four weeks, not ignoring your reply. I have returned ready to get a bit more serious about making clocks.
I was beginning to think nobody had anything to critique about my previous post and I could not believe that to be possible having been on other forums. Comments sometimes get nasty when people with entrenched positions feel that they must defend those positions vigourously. That’s when I drop out.

A few points.
I was, of course, looking at an ideal situation and life is always a compromise between the ideal and the practical.

The ”tick”, though satisfying, is result of wasted motion and in an “ideal” situation would not occur. (Compromise necessary.)
The pendulum is kept in motion by the escapement pushing slightly with each release. Load occurs at this push and the lower we can get this load (ie the lighter we can get the drop weights or the longer we can get the rewind time by reducing the spool size) the better. Reducing the pressure caused by heavy drop weights would have the added benefit of reducing the load on the teeth and arbors of the gears leading to the escapement, further reducing friction. Reducing friction is always a “win-win” situation.

I get most pleasure from the design process rather than the actual making of the product. I do not have the artistic flair or “hands-on” patience to be a fine woodworker (just ask my wife) and plan to make the gears, frame, hands etc for my clocks using laser cut acrylic. This allows me to design gears with tooth pitch of 2mm or less, better finish and much closer tolerances than are possible in CNC router cut wood. It also makes “trial and error” easier as I can adjust and cut a gear in fairly quick time. I will aim for “ideal” and then ease back until I find “practical”. Once I achieve this, I have a production-ready product, that challenge is over, and it’s time to start the next design.

I have my design almost finished and I am looking forward to building my prototype. This will quickly show me where my thoughts are in error and where compromise is required.

Greg
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby Gingernut » Wed Jun 30, 2010 2:35 pm

I have at last got my wooden clock plans/kits website up and running, at the moment I have only the one clock but more will follow shortly, I also offer a DXF CD for all those CNC addicts. I have designed it to be easily built and it has comprehensive assembly instructions.
http://www.woodentimes.com/
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby Gingernut » Wed Aug 18, 2010 10:43 am

Hello All

I have got my second clock the Secundus, ready for ordering plans, parts and DXFs. If you are interested please take a look.
http://www.woodentimes.com/

Yours Dave
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby davespenden » Wed Aug 18, 2010 6:21 pm

CWizard, very nice product and what looks to be a nice component layout. Do you plan on selling the component sheets, or the components cut out? Are you interested in selling your CRV design to folks on this forum whom can cut them out?
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby Gingernut » Thu Aug 19, 2010 7:09 am

Take a look on my website, I think that will pretty much answer all your questions. As to the CRVs, I do use cut 2D for generating my cutting paths, but they are specific to my machine and plywood size. I do however offer DXFs of all parts which can be, with moderate CAD skills, rearranged to fit your machine and your plywood. Plus, as you know, it is very easy to import DXFs into Vectric products.
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby fretsman68 » Thu Aug 19, 2010 11:06 pm

Really beautiful work you're doing there, Dave-- 8)

Thanks for sharing-
Dave
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby Gingernut » Mon Nov 22, 2010 5:17 pm

Hello All
I have got my new clock "Tertius" ready for ordering plans,DXF´s and cogs. It is a freestanding clock with a grasshopper escapement.
Yours Dave
http://www.woodentimes.com
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby Gingernut » Mon Jan 17, 2011 4:51 pm

My newest clock, the Quartus,is available as a complete kit, it runs for 2 1/2 days on one winding, for further details please take a look.
Wooden Clock plans and gears for scrollsaw and CNC
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby dgoodyear » Wed Apr 27, 2011 6:13 pm

I have been working on a clock of my own design and I am looking for some pointers. I am using gearotic for drawing the gears and cut2d for generating the toolpaths. I am just wondering...do you generate your toolpaths so the gears will be a little smaller than you wish, that way they will not bind? or do you just sand until they work?

Thanks. any input would be appreciated.
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby Mogal » Thu Jun 16, 2011 12:40 am

Fantastic job on the clocks here! I've been wanting to make a clock for awhile.
Although, I would like to make a wooden battery powered clock.
I've searched and searched, but come up with nothing.

Is this a silly idea?

There are 1rpm motors out there... would that be feasable for a start?
The reason for the battery powered version, is I would like consistant
movement of the gears, not the conventional 'tick tock'

suggestions?

P.S. I have ABSOLUTELY no idea about the timing of clocks, but slowly reading up on it...

Thanks!
Chris
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby signmaker » Fri Jun 24, 2011 8:24 pm

Hi Chris
Can you tell me where to get small, accurate, 1rpm battery powered motors (preferably cheap) that don't slow down as the battery loses power?
Such a motor would be ideal for making clocks.
Simply direct drive your escapement secondary gear (you can delete the large gear).
I have considered doing this and leaving the escapement and pendulum in place thus eliminating the need for a drop weight.
You could have a dummy drop weight.
It should work but would only be as accurate as the motor.
Has anyone tried this idea?
Greg
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby Mogal » Sat Jun 25, 2011 4:08 am

signmaker wrote:Hi Chris
Can you tell me where to get small, accurate, 1rpm battery powered motors (preferably cheap) that don't slow down as the battery loses power?
Such a motor would be ideal for making clocks.
Simply direct drive your escapement secondary gear (you can delete the large gear).
I have considered doing this and leaving the escapement and pendulum in place thus eliminating the need for a drop weight.
You could have a dummy drop weight.
It should work but would only be as accurate as the motor.
Has anyone tried this idea?
Greg


Hi Greg, for accuracy, lol not too sure, but there are 'Synchron 1 rpm' motors out there.(google)
I'm starting to think the battery powered ones are no good, but the electric ones, should be fine.
To the best of my knowledge, they are clock motors... working off the 60hz frequency.
I've never bought/tried one, they are expensive ~$40 with shipping.

Once I come across some plans that I like, and am comfortable making...
I just may suck up the price and try one out....
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby signmaker » Sat Jun 25, 2011 8:22 pm

Keep your eye on "clock motor" or "1rpm motor" on Ebay.
As I write there are 3 Synchron clock motors which have not got a bid but it's about to run out.
If you don't mind running a wire to a power outlet, you could try a 12v motor with a regulated power supply.
Accuracy should be OK.
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Re: Wooden gear clocks

Postby Gingernut » Thu Oct 27, 2011 4:04 pm

Hello All
I have at last managed to finish my new clock the Quintus, which is available as a complete kit as well as DXF plans. It is an electromagnetically powered clock so no winding, it also only needs a 9v block battery so also no lead.
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http://www.woodentimes.com/index.html
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